Scarab navigates by Milky Way

The scarab, or dung beetle, is the first insect known to navigate by watching the night sky. In a moonless night can orientate itself by the light of the Milky Way.   Image © Current Biology, Dacke et al

The scarab (Scarabaeus) feed on animal dung, which preparing into a ball and roll away, using the light of the Milky Way.

By doing so moves in a straight line, ensuring he do not circle back.

Marie Dacke of Lund University in Sweden, says some other insects might navigate by the Milky Way, too.

Scarab navigates by Milky Way Image © Current Biology, Dacke et al

The genus Scarabaeus consists of a number of Old World dung beetle species, including the “sacred scarab beetle”, Scarabaeus sacer. These beetles feed exclusively on dung, which they accomplish by rolling a piece of dung some distance from where it was deposited, and burying it in order to feed on it underground. They also prepare food for their larvae by excavating an underground chamber, and filling it with balls that have eggs laid in them.

Scarab navigates by Milky Way Image © Current Biology, Dacke et al

Scarab navigates by Milky Way Image © wikipedia

via newscientist

sources Marie Dackewikipedia

- See also: