M51 - The Whirlpool Galaxy by Martin Pugh

The Royal Observatory Greenwich presents the winning images of Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012. This free exhibition showcases some incredible images of the sky, ranging from within our solar system to far into deep space.   Deep Space category winner, and overall winner: M51 – The Whirlpool Galaxy by Martin Pugh (Australia).

In its fourth year, 2012 was another exceptional year for the competition with over 800 entries from astronomers and astrophotographers from around the world, with almost double the number of entrants to the Young category.



Martin Pugh has claimed the top prize for the second time.

‘I was always going to be excited about this image given the exceptional seeing conditions M51 was photographed under and the addition of several hours of Ha data has really boosted the HII regions.’

Star Icefall by Masahiro Miyasaka



Earth and Space winner: Star Icefall by Masahiro Miyasaka (Japan)

‘The stars fell from the heavens.
The stars transformed themselves into an icicle.
Stars sleep eternally here.’

Transit of Venus 2012 in Hydrogen-Alpha by Chris Warren

Our Solar System winner: Transit of Venus 2012 in Hydrogen-Alpha by Chris Warren (UK)

‘A single unprocessed raw frame shot between second and third contact. Our first and only glimpse of the transit before third contact, through a thin patch in the clouds at Blackheath in London.’

Pleiades Cluster by Jacob von Chorus

Young astrophotographers winner: Pleiades Cluster by Jacob von Chorus (Canada)

‘This image was a test to see what would happen with such a long exposure. It was taken near dusk, with only two frames and an hour of exposure. This image has since become one of my best.’

via Telegraph

source Royal Observatory’s Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition