Arctic ice reaches record low

 

Arctic sea ice is believe to have reached its 2012 summer minimum extent – the lowest ever recorded by satellite, on Sept 16 2012. It shrinks to just half the size it was in the 1980s.  Credit: NASA/Goddard Scientific Visualization Studio

Satellite data reveal how the new record low Arctic sea ice extent, from Sept. 16, 2012, compares to the average minimum extent over the past 30 years (in yellow). Sea ice extent maps are derived from data captured by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer aboard NASA’s Nimbus-7 satellite and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager on multiple satellites from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program.



The frozen cap of the Arctic Ocean appears to have reached its annual summertime minimum extent and broken a new record low on Sept. 16, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) has reported. Analysis of satellite data by NASA and the NASA-supported NSIDC at the University of Colorado in Boulder showed that the sea ice extent shrunk to 1.32 million square miles (3.41 million square kilometers).

The new record minimum measures almost 300,000 square miles less than the previous lowest extent in the satellite record, set in mid-September 2007, of 1.61 million square miles (4.17 million square kilometers). For comparison, the state of Texas measures around 268,600 square miles.

“Climate models have predicted a retreat of the Arctic sea ice; but the actual retreat has proven to be much more rapid than the predictions,” said Claire Parkinson, a climate scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. “There continues to be considerable inter-annual variability in the sea ice cover, but the long-term retreat is quite apparent.”



RV Healy northwest of Barrow, Alaska

Ice floes as seen from the RV Healy on August 20, 2012 northwest of Barrow, Alaska.

via NASA