Calderas of Russian Onekotan Island

Calderas of Russian Onekotan Island

January 25, 2011

Calderas of Onekotan Island

Snow cover highlights the calderas and volcanic cones that form the northern and southern ends of Onekotan Island, part of the Russian Federation in the western Pacific Ocean.

Calderas of Onekotan Island2

Calderas Onekotan Island3



Calderas are depressions formed when a volcano empties its magma chamber in an explosive eruption and then the overlaying material collapses into the evacuated space.

In this astronaut photograph from the International Space Station, the northern end of the island (image right) is dominated by the Nemo Peak volcano, which began forming within an older caldera approximately 9,500 years ago. The last recorded eruption at Nemo Peak occurred in the early 18th century.

The southern end of the island was formed by the 7.5 kilometer (4.6 mile) wide Tao-Rusyr Caldera. The caldera is filled by Kal’tsevoe Lake and Krenitzyn Peak, a volcano that has only erupted once in recorded history (in 1952).

via earthobservatory

By | 2011-01-25T03:00:11+00:00 Jan 25, 2011|Categories: Natural phenomena, Space|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Leave A Comment



CLOSE
CLOSE