GE OMG Microscope Can Catch Bacteria in the Act

GE OMG Microscope Can Catch Bacteria in the Act

GE OMG Microscope Can Catch Bacteria in the Act

A team of Australian researchers from the Ithree institute, have trained a powerful GE ‘OMG’ microscope catch Bacteria, HIV, and Malaria Parasites in the act.

Images © GE Reports



Above: Cancer, Metaphase epithelial cell in metaphase stained for microtubules (red), kinetochores (green) and DNA (blue). This image, taken by Indiana University’s Jane Stout, won the GE Healthcare Life Sciences 2012 Imaging Competition. The image will be displayed in Times Square in New York City on an electronic billboard in April. Credit: Jane Stout

The team leader, WEHI’s Dr. Jake Baum, said:

“The microscope provided a quantum leap in the amount of detail we can see, revealing key molecular and cellular events required for each stage of the invasion process.

This technology enables us to look at individual proteins that we always knew were involved in invasion, but we never knew what they did or where they were, and that, we believe, is a real leap for malaria researchers worldwide.”

GE OMG Microscope Can Catch Bacteria in the Act

Cancer, neurological disorders: Drosophila Melanogaster ovary labeled for microtubules (green), actin (purple) and DNA (blue). Credit: Timothy Weil

GE OMG Microscope Can Catch Bacteria in the Act (3)

Immunology and infection: CACO-2 intestinal epithelial cells stained to label the apical actin cytoskeleton. Credit: Matthew Tyska

GE OMG Microscope Can Catch Bacteria in the Act (4)

Cancer: Prometaphase human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell with GFP-histone labeled chromosomes (blue) stained for tubulin (yellow). Credit: Markus Posch

GE OMG Microscope Can Catch Bacteria in the Act (5)

Developmental biology: Human keratinocyte cells expressin GFP labeled keratin-14 (green) stained for DNA (blue). Credit: Graham Wright

GE OMG Microscope Can Catch Bacteria in the Act (6)

HIV: Tissue section stained for CD4+ cells (red), stroma (green) and nuclei (blue). Credit: Ann Carias

GE OMG Microscope Can Catch Bacteria in the Act (7)

Cancer: Mitotic spindle in a PTK1 cell stained for tubulin (green) and Ncd80 (red). Credit: Keith DeLuca

via gizmodo



source GE

 

By |2015-10-07T15:22:05+03:00Apr 1, 2013|Categories: Technology news|Tags: , , |

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