Google Earth's strange patterns in the Chinese desert

Google Earth reveals more strange patterns in the Chinese desert, but this time the researcher who found them thinks she knows what they are.

Images credit: Google Earth



Last year MailOnline reported how a satellite spotted strange grid-like structures in the Gobi desert.

Google Earth's strange patterns in the Chinese desert

Now Amelia Carolina Sparavigna, an assistant professor of physics at the Politecnico di Torino in Italy, highlighted by using Google Earth, a mysterious pattern in the Taklamakan desert in western China.

She discovered an 8km long line of squares just south of the town of Ruoqiang (see it on Google Maps).



Now she believes that a recent announcement by the Chinese government of the discovery of a 1.28 million nickel ore reserve in the region, has something to do with her discovery.

According to MIT Technology Review:

“She says the grid is the result of a comprehensive geological survey of the region. This process begins with the identification of a geological anomaly associated with the ore, then the widespread digging of trenches and boreholes to identify the ore and map it. It is this second stage that have produced the grids.

That sounds like a reasonable explanation although the sheer number of boreholes dug over such a wide area beggars belief.



One possibility is that there was some element of training involved in which large numbers of students practiced their surveying techniques in the desert.”

Google Earth's strange patterns in the Chinese desert

Google Earth's strange patterns in the Chinese desert

via MailOnline

source MIT Technology Review