Alan Eustace set stratospheric exploration record

Alan Eustace former Google exec, jumped from a balloon and make highest-altitude jump, a stratospheric exploration record at over 135,000 feet.

Alan Eustace jumped from 135,890 feet above the Earth, breaking the record set two years ago by Felix Baumgartner, by more than 7,000 feet.



Alan Eustace set stratospheric exploration record

Alan Eustace and StratEx (short for Stratospheric Explorer) program goal was to develop a self-contained spacesuit and recovery system that would allow manned exploration of the stratosphere above 100,000 feet.

Alan Eustace set stratospheric exploration record

Such a system has wide-ranging applications for; the study of the science of the stratosphere, development of means for spaceship crew egress, the study of dynamics of bodies at Mach 1, new high altitude aircraft suits, and setting of records for space diving, sailplaning and ballooning. StratEx flew using a scientific balloon, and is capable of being used with different kinds of vehicles other than balloons, such as stratospheric aircraft.



Alan Eustace, Google’s Senior Vice President, took a not-so-typical sabbatical from his daily life as an executive by contacting Paragon to achieve his goals. Paragon formed a dedicated, experienced technical team that would further test the boundaries of science by sending a man to the Stratosphere via a helium-filled scientific balloon while wearing a custom-made pressurized spacesuit and Paragon designed life support system.

“I always wondered: what if you could design a system that would allow humans to explore the stratosphere as easily and safely as they do the ocean? With the help of the world-class StratEx team, I hope we’ve encouraged others to explore this part of the world about which we still know so little.” — Alan Eustace

Alan Eustace set stratospheric exploration record



via engadget

source StratEx