NASA's Space Environment Simulation Lab

The Space Environment Simulation Lab (SESL) at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, was built in 1965 to be used for thermal-vacuum testing for all U.S. manned spacecraft of the Apollo program era. Can you see the engineers?

Images credit: NASA



NASA's Space Environment Simulation Lab

In this NASA‘s facilities full-scale flight hardware could be tested here. An essential procedure for the safety of astronauts and the success of the space program.

The facility is split into two test chambers A and B. In chamber A full-scale flight hardware could be tested.

Now the laboratory continues in its original use, and it is in very good condition.



NASA's Space Environment Simulation Lab

“The SESL was built in 1965 to conduct thermal-vacuum testing for all US manned spacecraft of the Apollo Era. The large size of chamber A meant that full-scale flight hardware could be tested. In addition to Apollo modules, it has been used to test spacesuits, the Skylab/Apollo telescope mount system, various Space Shuttle systems, the Apollo/Soyuz docking module, and various large-scale satellite systems.

The Space Environment Simulation Lab (SESL) contains two large man-rated chambers, instrumentation and data systems, and support facilities. The test chambers have been designated a National Historic Landmark. The chambers, used for space simulation tests, have rotatable floors, dual man-locks to move from ambient air pressure to a thermal-vacuum environment, and irradiation capabilities for various solar simulations.”

see also: World’s largest Vacuum Chamber



sources NASA, NPS