Sundial

A newly proposed clock that uses the orbit of a neutron around an atomic nucleus to keep time would be so accurate that it would only gain or lose 1/20th of a second every 14 billion years – or about the lifetime of the universe.

The unprecedented accuracy of this new technique comes from linking the system to the orbit of a neutron within an atomic nucleus. That makes it more accurate than atomic clocks, explains Professor Victor Flambaum, Head of Theoretical Physics at UNSW.



An atomic clock, in witch electrons revolve around an atom, cannot even be compared by this new clock. “This is nearly 100 times more accurate than the best atomic clocks we have now,” Flambaum said.
FOCS 1, a continuous cold caesium fountain atomic clock in Switzerland

FOCS 1, a continuous cold caesium fountain atomic clock in Switzerland, started operating in 2004 at an uncertainty of one second in 30 million years

via dailymail