the human Brain (1)

How the human mind really works. Now scientists are turning their attention to the complex circuits that connect the brain’s many regions—some 100,000 miles of fibers called white matter, enough to circle the Earth four times.   Image © Robert Clark/National Geographic

In this image taken at the Martinos Center, pink and orange bundles transmit signals critical for language. VAN WEEDEN AND L. L. WALD, MARTINOS CENTER FOR BIOMEDICAL IMAGING, HUMAN CONNECTOME PROJECT; BRAIN PREPARATION PERFORMED AT ALLEN INSTITUTE FOR BRAIN SCIENCE



the human Brain (2)

Image © Robert Clark/National Geographic

When you form a memory, “there’s a physical change in the brain,” says Don Arnold, of the University of Southern California. Red and green dots on the branches extending from this rat neuron show where it contacts other neurons. As the rat forms new memories, new dots appear and old ones vanish. GARRETT GROSS AND DON ARNOLD, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

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Image © Robert Clark/National Geographic

Two hundred sections of a piece of mouse brain, each less than 1/1,000 the thickness of a human hair, are readied to be imaged by an electron microscope. Arranged in stacks, 10,000 such photomicrographs form a 3-D model no larger than a grain of salt (in tweezers). A human brain visualized at this level of detail would require an amount of data equal to all the written material in all the libraries of the world.

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Image © National Geographic

The images are from the February issue of National Geographic magazine.

source National Geographic