health monitoring skin patch

This thin, soft stick-on patches, that stretch and move with the skin, incorporate off-the-shelf chip-based electronics for sophisticated wireless health monitoring.   Image © John A. Rogers

The new device was developed by John A. Rogers of Illinois and Yonggang Huang of Northwestern University.



“We designed this device to monitor human health 24/7, but without interfering with a person’s daily activity,” said Yonggang Huang, the Northwestern University professor who co-led the work with Illinois professor John A. Rogers. “It is as soft as human skin and can move with your body, but at the same time it has many different monitoring functions. What is very important about this device is it is wirelessly powered and can send high-quality data about the human body to a computer, in real time.”

“Our original epidermal devices exploited specialized device geometries – super thin, structured in certain ways,” Rogers said. “But chip-scale devices, batteries, capacitors and other components must be re-formulated for these platforms. There’s a lot of value in complementing this specialized strategy with our new concepts in microfluidics and origami interconnects to enable compatibility with commercial off-the-shelf parts for accelerated development, reduced costs and expanded options in device types.”

health monitoring skin patch 2



via gizmag

source University of Illinois