The New Age of Exploration (4)

Ever since our species left Africa some 60,000 years ago, the urge to push beyond what’s known—to discover new lands and opportunities—has shaped human culture. And that impulse is still strong.
As we celebrate the National Geographic Society’s 125th anniversary, we’re kicking off a year of stories about the new age of exploration.

Cory Richards and his two fellow climbers endured hurricane-force winds and temperatures of minus 50°F as they struggled to reach the summit of Gasherbrum II.    Photo by Cory Richards/National Geographic



Above image: “When you do succeed—well, you never conquer a mountain,” Richards reflects. “You are always its guest. In this case, we were its guest when it was in a bad mood.”Cory Richards and his two fellow climbers endured hurricane-force winds and temperatures of minus 50°F as they struggled to reach the summit of Gasherbrum II.

 

The New Age of Exploration (3)Photo by Carsten Peter/National Geographic

A team of scientists pitches camp in a lethal environment of heat and toxic gases. Photographer Carsten Peter documents their efforts to fathom the fiery workings of Nyiragongo volcano in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

 

The New Age of Exploration (2)Photo by Brian Skerry/National Geographic



Curious creatures meet 70 feet deep off the remote Auckland Islands, 300 miles south of New Zealand. In these unfished waters, Brian Skerry photographs a diver encountering a southern right whale that may have never seen a human before.
The New Age of ExplorationNational Geographic

The images are from the January issue of National Geographic magazine.

source National Geographic