What It's Worth (4)

For What It’s Worth project, an attempt to visualise the output of a mine, by photographer and artist from Cape Town Dillon Marsh.

Dillon Marsh took photos of five famous mines and then using data about extraction rates, calculated a spherical body representing the amount of copper that had been mined.



Above image: West O’okiep Mine, Okiep (1862 to the early 1970s). Over 500m deep, 284,000 tonnes of copper extracted.  Credit Dillon Marsh

What It's Worth (3)

Nababeep South Mine, Nababeep (1882 to 2000). Over 500m deep, 302,791.65 tonnes of copper extracted. Credit Dillon Marsh

“Whether they are active or long dormant, mines speak of a combination of sacrifice and gain. Their features are crude, unsightly scars on the landscape – unlikely feats of hard labour and specialised engineering, constructed to extract value from the earth but also exacting a price.

These images combine photography and computer generated elements in an effort to visualise the output of a mine. The CGI objects represent a scale model of the materials removed from each mine, a solid mass occupying a scene showing the ground from which it was extracted.”

What It's Worth (2)

Tweefontein Mine, Concordia (1887 to 1904). Over 100m deep, 38,747.7 tonnes of copper extracted. Credit Dillon Marsh

What It's Worth (1)

Jubilee Mine, Concordia (1971 to 1973). Over 100m deep, 6,500 tonnes of copper extracted. Credit Dillon Marsh

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Read more at Dillon Marsh website