An Object right between Planet and Star

An Object right between Planet and Star

August 10, 2018

SIMP J01365663+0933473, an object with 12.7 times the mass of Jupiter

Astronomers detect for the first time possible extrasolar planetary-mass, at boundary between giant planet and brown dwarf.

Using the National Science Foundation’s Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), astronomers have made the first radio-telescope detection of a planetary-mass object beyond our Solar System. The object, about a dozen times more massive than Jupiter, is a surprisingly strong magnetic powerhouse and a “rogue,” traveling through space unaccompanied by any parent star.



Above, artist’s conception of SIMP J01365663+0933473, an object with 12.7 times the mass of Jupiter, but a magnetic field 200 times more powerful than Jupiter’s. This object is 20 light-years from Earth.  Credit: Caltech/Chuck Carter; NRAO/AUI/NSF

Melodie Kao, who led this study while a graduate student at Caltech, and is now a Hubble Postdoctoral Fellow at Arizona State University, said:

“This object is right at the boundary between a planet and a brown dwarf, or ‘failed star,’ and is giving us some surprises that can potentially help us understand magnetic processes on both stars and planets.”

The difference between a gas giant planet and a brown dwarf remains hotly debated among astronomers, but one rule of thumb that astronomers use is the mass below which deuterium fusion ceases, known as the “deuterium-burning limit”, around 13 Jupiter masses.

source National Radio Observatory



 

By | 2018-08-10T11:38:09+00:00 Aug 10, 2018|Categories: Astronomy|Tags: |

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